Time to Vaccinate Those Horses! Right?

The American Association of Equine Practitioners has developed a recommended vaccination schedule for horses in the USA.  The AAEP recommends that all horses get  vaccinated against tetanus, encephalomyelitis, West Nile Disease and Rabies every year.

While these recommendations are certainly sound, they may be a bit on the cautious side, and many horse owners are becoming concerned about the health impact of over vaccinating their horses.

Many horses experience complications when they are vaccinated.  Complications can be mild, as in the case of lethargy, swelling at the injection site or a low fever, but some horses experience significant side effects from certain vaccines.  More serious reactions include colic, neurological symptoms and other reactions that may be life-threatening.

Some veterinarians, including many holistic veterinarians, don’t necessarily agree wholeheartedly with the AAEP’s recommendations.  These veterinarians advocate a more individualized approach to vaccinating horses.

These more customized approaches may include using blood tests to determine the level of antibodies a horse already has against various diseases or carefully assessing a horse’s potential risk of being exposed to communicable diseases such as influenza.

I just came across a very interesting article written by holistic veterinarian Dr. Joyce Harman:  it is a list of each type of vaccine that is commonly administered to horses on the east coast, and how likely each one is to be effective and/or whether that type of vaccine is likely to produce severe reactions in horses who are sensitive.

I thought that this was one of the more helpful pieces of content I have ever come across on this topic.  It is well worth reading.

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Ramm Fence is On Sale

If you want to put up some fancy fencing for your livestock, Ramm Fence is a good place to get it from.  Ramm Horse Fencing and Stalls is an Ohio-based company that sells high quality fencing at prices to match.

Ramm Fencing and Stalls may not quite be the Neiman Marcus of horse fence–I would give that title to Premier Equestrian, a company which sells their wares at prices that are well beyond the reach of mere mortals–but it’s darn close.  I’d compare Ramm to Nordstrom for your farm because, in my limited dealings with their customer service department, the folks at Ramm have been friendly and helpful, and they seem to pride themselves on keeping their customers happy.

I have about two acres of pasture that needs new fence, and I would love to be able to buy some Ramm fence for it.  At regular price, it is well beyond my budget at this point (hello T-posts and aluminum wire), but on sale, it may simply be mostly over budget.  (Hello home equity loan).

Here is a link to the Ramm Fencing and Stalls sales flyer.  Many of the fencing products are between 8% and 20% off, and the sale runs February 1 to February 29, 2016.

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

I Wish That I Could Take My Horse On the Subway

Here in the good ol’ US of A, horses don’t seem to capture the national imagination the way that they do in some other countries.  England, Germany, France, Austria, Holland, Sweden and apparently Norway are countries where horses hold a real place in the national identity.

Here’s a video of what appears to be a Norwegian Fjord horse riding on a sparkling clean subway in Norway.  This is something which I can barely imagine a horse being allowed to do in the US, even as a publicity stunt:

Horse Taking a Subway Ride in Norway

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Sample Page

This is an example page. It’s different from a blog post because it will stay in one place and will show up in your site navigation (in most themes). Most people start with an About page that introduces them to potential site visitors. It might say something like this:

Hi there! I’m a bike messenger by day, aspiring actor by night, and this is my blog. I live in Los Angeles, have a great dog named Jack, and I like piña coladas. (And gettin’ caught in the rain.)

…or something like this:

The XYZ Doohickey Company was founded in 1971, and has been providing quality doohickies to the public ever since. Located in Gotham City, XYZ employs over 2,000 people and does all kinds of awesome things for the Gotham community.

As a new WordPress user, you should go to your dashboard to delete this page and create new pages for your content. Have fun!

Leave a comment

Hello world!

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

King and Queen of the Garden

Every year, I keep an eye on the outstanding performers in my garden. These have to be varieties that thrive despite my relatively low level of management, and can be grown without the use of synthetic fungicides or insecticides.

On top of that, I want these plants to make the tastiest produce that I can imagine, or maybe even exceed my wildest taste bud fantasies.

This year, the top varieties in my garden were Tasty King cucumber and New Queen watermelon. They reigned all summer long, and the New Queen was just about the most delicious watermelon that I have ever tasted, other than an off the charts melon grown on the NC Bogue Banks that I bought right out of the field from the grower.

The summer squash also did pretty well this year, holding up for most of the season despite squash bug pressure. My poor record keeping strikes again: those hardy squash plants were either Supersett or Gentry, but I’m not sure which. I’ll plan to plant both of those again next year and do another trial.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

King and Queen of the Garden

Every year, I keep an eye on the outstanding performers in my garden. These have to be varieties that thrive despite my relatively low level of management, and can be grown without the use of synthetic fungicides or insecticides.

On top of that, I want these plants to make the tastiest produce that I can imagine, or maybe even exceed my wildest taste bud fantasies.

This year, the top varieties in my garden were Tasty King cucumber and New Queen watermelon. They reigned all summer long, and the New Queen was just about the most delicious watermelon that I have ever tasted, other than an off the charts melon grown on the NC Bogue Banks that I bought right out of the field from the grower.

The summer squash also did pretty well this year, holding up for most of the season despite squash bug pressure. My poor record keeping strikes again: those hardy squash plants were either Supersett or Gentry, but I’m not sure which. I’ll plan to plant both of those again next year and do another trial.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The $64 Plumcot

Every once in a while, I’ll meet a back to the lander who harkens back to the 1970′s and will share stories about the good ol’ days with me. They tell tales of honey bee colonies that needed no care other than harvesting the honey a couple of times a year, and orchards so carefree and full of plums, peaches and other goodies that all they had to do was take a bother to take break from shaking their tambourines in order to harvest the fruit and turn it into jam, brandy or whatever else suited them.

I don’t know if things were really that good back then, or if they are just yanking my chain, but my experiences with organic fruit growing in North Carolina do not jive with their recollections.

When I look at my orchard, I spy a sea of cedar apple rust, a smattering of fire blight and brown rot that is legion. Insects, squirrels and my very own chickens try to make off with what the bacteria and fungi haven’t already claimed.

But, reminiscent of the parable about the Buddhist monk savoring berries while he is dangling precariously from the edge of a cliff, any fruit that manages to make it into my mouth tastes especially sweet.

So far this year, I have enjoyed strawberries that escaped both frost damage and relentless browsing by deer. The pounds of cherries that we pitted and froze were a bountiful and delicious reminder that all of our fruit growing is not doomed to failure (only a little bit of brown rot on some of the fruit).

And, the sweetest victory so far this season: a few velvety Spring Satin plumcots. I ate them while standing under the trees canopy, closing my eyes so that I wouldn’t look up at the brown-rotted brethren of the fruit that I was ingesting.

I try to savor every piece of fruit that I get from the orchards and fields, and do my best to not dwell on the masses of rotted “mummy” fruit that I am going to have to harvest and dispose of. In an interview with NPR, William Alexander, author of “The $64 Tomato” made a statement that I agree with: “it’s not about what it actually costs to eat this piece of fruit. It’s really about lifestyle. And the garden really for us was a kind of family member, for better or for worse.”

I could (and do!)have worse family members than my beloved brown rotted trees. I’m living the dream, but being careful to not bite into any bugs while I do it.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The $64 Plumcot

Every once in a while, I’ll meet a back to the lander who harkens back to the 1970’s and will share stories about the good ol’ days with me. They tell tales of honey bee colonies that needed no care other than harvesting the honey a couple of times a year, and orchards so carefree and full of plums, peaches and other goodies that all they had to do was take a bother to take break from shaking their tambourines in order to harvest the fruit and turn it into jam, brandy or whatever else suited them.

I don’t know if things were really that good back then, or if they are just yanking my chain, but my experiences with organic fruit growing in North Carolina do not jive with their recollections.

When I look at my orchard, I spy a sea of cedar apple rust, a smattering of fire blight and brown rot that is legion. Insects, squirrels and my very own chickens try to make off with what the bacteria and fungi haven’t already claimed.

But, reminiscent of the parable about the Buddhist monk savoring berries while he is dangling precariously from the edge of a cliff, any fruit that manages to make it into my mouth tastes especially sweet.

So far this year, I have enjoyed strawberries that escaped both frost damage and relentless browsing by deer. The pounds of cherries that we pitted and froze were a bountiful and delicious reminder that all of our fruit growing is not doomed to failure (only a little bit of brown rot on some of the fruit).

And, the sweetest victory so far this season: a few velvety Spring Satin plumcots. I ate them while standing under the trees canopy, closing my eyes so that I wouldn’t look up at the brown-rotted brethren of the fruit that I was ingesting.

I try to savor every piece of fruit that I get from the orchards and fields, and do my best to not dwell on the masses of rotted “mummy” fruit that I am going to have to harvest and dispose of. In an interview with NPR, William Alexander, author of “The $64 Tomato” made a statement that I agree with: “it’s not about what it actually costs to eat this piece of fruit. It’s really about lifestyle. And the garden really for us was a kind of family member, for better or for worse.”

I could (and do!)have worse family members than my beloved brown rotted trees. I’m living the dream, but being careful to not bite into any bugs while I do it.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Full of Beans

Yesterday, I planted edamame and pole beans. After the winter we had, planting beans seems optimistic, even this late in the season. I still have been bracing for more snow.

Anyhow, I planted a couple of my favorite varieties: Tamara pole bean and Red Noodle. I also planted a couple of new varieties that I wanted to try: Emerite and Orient Wonder pole beans.

And I can never give up on edamame, although they have always been very hit or miss for us and tend to get devoured by rodents even when they do produce a good crop. I planted a short season variety, Karikachi, to see if that increases our success.

I also had a packet of Black Pearl soybean sitting around (packed for 2010!?) that I planted alongside the other soybeans. I think that they are also an edamame bean, but seem to be hard to come by these days, so I’ve been having trouble finding a variety description for them.

I originally got them from Territorial seed. I guess I should have saved their 2010 catalog along with the seeds. . . Ugh. Call the hording police!

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment